• Users Online: 225
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 183-190

Geriatric nutritional risk index in screening malnutrition among young adult and elderly trauma patients


1 Department of General Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
2 Department of Trauma Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
3 Department of Plastic Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Ching-Hua Hsieh
No. 123, Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Song District, Kaohsiung City 83301
Taiwan
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/fjs.fjs_44_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: The geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) calculated as 1.489 × albumin (g/dL) +41.7× (current body weight/ideal body weight) is useful in identifying high-risk for malnutrition in elderly patients with subacute or chronic diseases. Given that trauma patients have sustained injuries in an acute condition, this study is designed to explore the association between GNRI on admission and outcomes in elderly and young adult patients with trauma. Materials and Methods: From January 01, 2009, to December 31, 2019, a total of 1772 elderly and 2194 young adult trauma patients were categorized into four nutritional risk groups according to GNRI: high-risk group (GNRI <82), moderate-risk group (GNRI 82 to <92), low-risk group (GNRI 92–98), and no-risk group (GNRI >98). Propensity score-matched patient cohorts were created in different nutritional risk groups against the no-risk group to minimize the confounding effects of sex, age, pre-existing comorbidities, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score on outcome measurements. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcome was the length of hospital stay. Results: Young adult patients with trauma were comparable in pattern of mortality outcomes and hospital stays to that in elderly patients. Analysis of the selected propensity score-matched patient cohorts revealed that both elderly and young adult patients in the high-risk group had significantly higher odds of mortality (elderly, odds ratio [OR], 6.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.00-14.03; P < 0.009; young adult, OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.45-5.11; P = 0.001) and longer hospital stay (elderly, 21.5 days vs. 12.4 days, respectively, P < 0.001; young adults, 22.5 days vs. 14.1 days, respectively, P < 0.001) than those of the no-risk group. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the GNRI could serve as a useful screening method to identify high-risk malnutrition in acutely injured trauma patients, including not only the elderly trauma patients but also the young adult trauma patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed337    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded43    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal