• Users Online: 202
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 140-146

Can sensory protection improve the functional outcome in delay repaired rat brachial plexus injury?


1 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical College and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan
3 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical College and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan; Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Freiburg University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Johnny Chuieng-Yi Lu
No. 5, Fu-Hsing St. Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan
Taiwan
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/fjs.fjs_233_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: Reconstruction of brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) at a delayed time point may prolong the denervation of target muscles and jeopardize the outcome. Sensory protection has been hailed as a promising technique that may help preserve muscle mass and restore functional outcome. We utilize the rat brachial plexus model to investigate the difference between early and delay repair, and evaluate if sensory protection of distal nerves can assist in delayed repair. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight Lewis rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 12 in each group, including one positive control group). All the rats were transected at the upper, middle, and lower trunk levels with a 2-cm gap. Group I underwent immediate reconstruction from the upper trunk to the median; Group II underwent the same reconstruction but at 4 months after the initial transection; Group III was same as Group II and additional sensory protection to the median nerve via a nerve graft from the lower trunk. The final outcome was studied and analyzed 16 weeks postoperatively. Results: Group I (immediate repair) showed the best functional results in muscle contraction force, muscle action potential, and muscle weight, in addition to higher axon counts. Groups II and III (delayed repair) both showed inferior results to Group I, and sensory protection did not show any significant improvements in outcome. Conclusion: Delayed repair still shows inferior outcomes to acute repair in BPIs. There is no sufficient evidence to support the use of sensory protection in delayed repair.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed260    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded36    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal