Formosan Journal of Surgery

CASE REPORT
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 51  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 158--161

Surgical treatment for duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula


Kuo-Yang Hsi, Jiann-Ming Wu, Kuo-Hsin Chen 
 Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City 220, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jiann-Ming Wu
Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, No-21, Sec. 2, Nanya S. Rd, Banqiao District, New Taipei City 220
Taiwan

Abstract

We report the case of a 58-year-old man diagnosed as having right renal stones and who had undergone shock wave lithotripsy several times. However, residual stones persisted and resulted in pyelonephritis and renal abscess. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) was performed. However, bile content discharge from the PCNL wound was observed later. Abdominal computed tomography revealed multiseptated right renal abscess with the right psoas muscle involvement and obscure plane between the right kidney and the duodenum. A fistulogram demonstrated the presence of duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula. He underwent right nephrectomy and wedge resection of the duodenum for the closure of the fistula. The postoperative course was smooth, and the PCNL wound healed spontaneously during the admission. He remained asymptomatic 6 months after the operation. This report includes a literature review on the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the renoduodenal fistula.



How to cite this article:
Hsi KY, Wu JM, Chen KH. Surgical treatment for duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula.Formos J Surg 2018;51:158-161


How to cite this URL:
Hsi KY, Wu JM, Chen KH. Surgical treatment for duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula. Formos J Surg [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Oct 24 ];51:158-161
Available from: https://www.e-fjs.org/text.asp?2018/51/4/158/239559


Full Text

 Introduction



Renoduodenal fistula is an uncommon disease. Most cases occur spontaneously because of chronic inflammation of the urinary tract, more than 50% of which result from nephrolithiasis. The most commonly involved area is the middle part of the right kidney and the second or third portion of the duodenum due to anatomical proximity and fixation of the duodenum. Patients with renoduodenal fistula usually present with flank pain and urinary tract infection. Computed tomography (CT) and fistulography, if feasible, are the most useful diagnostic tools to confirm the presence of the fistula. The mainstay of treatment for renoduodenal fistula is still surgical intervention, including nephrectomy and closure of the fistula by partial resection of the affected duodenum. However, the diagnosis and treatment of renoduodenal fistula remain clinical challenges both for urologists and general surgeons.

 Case Report



A 58-year-old man who had diabetes mellitus and a surgical history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis had been diagnosed as having right renal stones since 2006. He had undergone shock-wave lithotripsy several times, but residual stones persisted and resulted in pyelonephritis with renal abscess formation in 2015. He underwent percutaneous pigtail drainage for renal abscess in September 2015.

He had intermittent right flank pain during the next few months. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) was performed in January 2016 for the persistence of pyelonephritis. Owing to the suspicion of malignancy on the basis of the CT findings, renal mass biopsy was performed in July 2016, and the pathological examination revealed no evidence of malignancy.

Intermittent right flank pain persisted during follow-up in the outpatient department. Bile content discharge from the PCNL wound was observed later. Follow-up CT scans showed multiseptated right renal abscess with right psoas muscle involvement and obscure plane between the right kidney and duodenum. It suggested a duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula. Fistulography with contrast medium injected through the PCNL wound tract demonstrated communication with the duodenal lumen [Figure 1]. The duodeno-reno-cutaneous fistula was proved. Surgical intervention for definite treatment was suggested, but he hesitated and preferred conservative treatment.{Figure 1}

However, intermittent right flank pain and bile content discharge from the PCNL wound persisted. He finally decided to accept surgical treatment. Preoperative CT scans showed residual renal stones, renal abscess with right psoas muscle involvement, and unclear margin between the right kidney and third portion of the duodenum [Figure 2]. He underwent right nephrectomy, wedge resection of the duodenum for the closure of the fistula, and feeding jejunostomy through a midline laparotomy wound on May 10, 2017. Jejunostomy feeding with glucose water was started the next day after the operation. It was shifted to tube feeding diet, and the amount was increased gradually. He resumed tolerable oral intake 8 days after the operation. The postoperative course was smooth. No evidence of duodenal stenosis, leak, or intra-abdominal infection was found. The PCNL wound healed spontaneously during the admission. The pathological examination revealed a renal abscess with necrotizing and granulomatous inflammation, consistent with renoduodenal fistula. He was discharged uneventfully 10 days after the operation. The jejunostomy tube was removed when the patient revisited our outpatient department for postoperative follow-up. He remained asymptomatic 6 months after the operation. Postoperative abdominal CT scans [Figure 3] revealed status post right nephrectomy and wedge resection of duodenum. There is no evidence of residual psoas abscess or fistula.{Figure 2}{Figure 3}

 Discussion



Renoduodenal fistula (also known as pyeloduodenal fistula) is an uncommon disease. The first documented case was reported in 1893.[1] So far, nearly 100 cases have been reported in the literature.[2] Most cases of renoduodenal fistula occurred spontaneously owing to chronic inflammation of the urinary tract, of which more than 50% resulted from nephrolithiasis,[3] similar to our case. Other causes of renoduodenal fistula included trauma, foreign body ingestion,[4] tuberculosis, malignancy,[5] inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, and iatrogenic procedures such as nasogastric tube[6] or nephrostomy tube insertion.[7] The etiology of renoduodenal fistula is summarized as shown in [Table 1].{Table 1}

Nowadays, nephrolithiasis is the leading cause of spontaneous renoduodenal fistula.[3] It is not difficult to imagine that any reason leading to obstruction of the urinary tract will result in a series of inflammatory changes. Superimposed infection and subsequent abscess formation may occur. Repeated infection and chronic inflammation persist sometimes may result in fistula formation between the diseased kidney and the adjacent bowel tract. The most commonly involved area is the middle part of the right kidney and the second or third portion of the duodenum, similar to our case. In addition to the anatomical proximity, this part of the duodenum is relatively immobile.[8]

Patients with renoduodenal fistula usually present with flank pain and urinary tract infection. Gastrointestinal bleeding presenting as hematemesis is rare but had been reported before.[9] A renoduodenal fistula is difficult to recognize on plain radiography. Even for intravenous pyelography and retrograde pyelography, the sensitivity for correct diagnosis is not satisfactory.[3],[10] Intravenous pyelography may be helpful for diagnosis in patients whose diseased kidney still has function. Upper gastrointestinal series with a water-soluble contrast medium could also be considered. In rare circumstances, esophagogastroduodenoscopy may be useful for the diagnosis of renoduodenal fistula due to gastrointestinal origin such as foreign-body penetration.[10] CT and fistulography, if feasible, are the most useful diagnostic tools to confirm the presence of fistula.[11],[12],[13]

The mainstay of treatment for renoduodenal fistula is still surgical intervention, including nephrectomy and closure of the fistula by partial resection of the affected duodenum. Endoscopic closure of the fistula may be successful in highly selected patients.[14] For patients with trauma-related renoduodenal fistula, trying to preserve the affected but still functioning kidney would be reasonable during the operation.

 Conclusion



The diagnosis and treatment of renoduodenal fistula remain clinical challenges both for urologists and general surgeons. Surgical treatment is an effective and feasible method to manage this unusual condition in patients with failed medical treatment.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

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